Zika Information

About Zika


Zika virus disease (Zika) is a disease caused by the Zika virus, which is spread to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito. The most common symptoms of Zika are fever, rash, joint pain, and conjunctivitis (red eyes). The illness is usually mild with symptoms lasting for several days to a week after being bitten by an infected mosquito. People usually don’t get sick enough to go to the hospital, and they very rarely die of Zika. For this reason, many people might not realize they have been infected. However, Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause a serious birth defect called microcephaly, as well as other severe fetal brain defects. Once a person has been infected, he or she is likely to be protected from future infections.

 
Zika virus was first discovered in 1947 and is named after the Zika Forest in Uganda. In 1952, the first human cases of Zika were detected and since then, outbreaks of Zika have been reported in tropical Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Islands. Zika outbreaks have probably occurred in many locations. Before 2007, at least 14 cases of Zika had been documented, although other cases were likely to have occurred and were not reported. Because the symptoms of Zika are similar to those of many other diseases, many cases may not have been recognized.
 
In May 2015, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) issued an alert regarding the first confirmed Zika virus infection in Brazil. On February 1, 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared Zika virus a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC). Local transmission has been reported in many other countries and territories. Zika virus will likely continue to spread to new areas.
 
Specific areas where Zika is spreading are often difficult to determine and are likely to change over time. If traveling, please visit the CDC Travelers' Health site for the most updated travel information.

For more information on Zika via the CDC, visit here:alt

Prevention

What we know:
  • No vaccine exists to prevent Zika virus disease (Zika).
  • Prevent Zika by avoiding mosquito bites (see below).
  • Mosquitoes that spread Zika virus bite mostly during the daytime.
  • Mosquitoes that spread Zika virus also spread dengue and chikungunya viruses.
  • Prevent sexual transmission of Zika by using condoms or not having sex
  • Steps to prevent mosquito bite.
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When in areas with Zika and other diseases spread by mosquitoes, take the following steps:
  • Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.
  • Stay in places with air conditioning and window and door screens to keep mosquitoes outside.
  • Take steps to control mosquitoes inside and outside your home.
  • Sleep under a mosquito bed net if you are overseas or outside and are not able to protect yourself from mosquito bites.
  • Use Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellents with one of the following active ingredients: DEET, picaridin, IR3535, oil of lemon eucalyptus, or para-menthane-diol. Choosing an EPA-registered repellent ensures the EPA has evaluated the product for effectiveness. When used as directed, EPA-registered insect repellents are proven safe and effective, even for pregnant and breast-feeding women.
  • Always follow the product label instructions.
  • Reapply insect repellent as directed.
  • Do not spray repellent on the skin under clothing.
  • If you are also using sunscreen, apply sunscreen before applying insect repellent.
 
Zika and Pregnancy

Zika virus can be passed from a pregnant woman to her fetus, and infection during pregnancy can cause a serious birth defect of the brain called microcephaly and other severe brain defects. Other problems have been detected among fetuses and infants infected with Zika virus before birth, such as defects of the eye, hearing deficits, and impaired growth.  CDC recommends special precautions for pregnant women. Women who are pregnant should not travel to areas with Zika. If you must travel to one of these areas or if you live in an area with Zika, talk to your doctor or other healthcare provider and strictly follow steps to prevent mosquito bites and to prevent sexual transmission.

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Program Structure

The Environmental Health Program provides licensing, inspection, training, and enforcement functions for the Worcester County Health Department in areas related to food service, swimming pools and spas, animal bites and rabies, and other aspects of environmental health that may affect community health and safety.


 

Frequently Asked Questions

Services

The Environmental Health Program offers services related to:

 


They are also responsible for:

Information

        General Information

         Food Safety

         Pool Safety


Location

Isle of Wight Center (across from Ocean City, off RT 90)
13070 St. Martin's Neck Road,
Bishopville, MD 21813
Directions
Phone:  410-352-3234 and 410-641-9559 (toll free from Pocomoke area)
Fax:  410-352-3369
Hours:  8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Also located at the Isle of Wight Center:
Worc. Co. Dept. of Development, Review and Permitting: 410-352-3057

Worc. Co. Treasurer's Office: 410-352-3055

 

Substance Abuse Help

 

Zika Information

 

Rabies Information


     

WCHD News

The Pocomoke City Police Department has installed a Medicine Drop Box to offer residents a safe way to dispose of unused or expired medications.

The Pocomoke City Police Department is pleased to announce that a permanent Medicine Drop box has been installed in the lobby of the police department located at 1500 Market Street Pocomoke City, MD. The drop box is intended to help residents dispose of unwanted medicines and pharmaceuticals in a safe and secure way.

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Join Ocean City Mayor Rick Meehan and Worcester County Health Department's Kathy Wool for a virtual tour of the famous Ocean City, Maryland Boardwalk. The Boardwalk is an iconic example of how walkable Worcester can be. 

 

New education and training campaign focused on substance use disorders

(Snow Hill, MD)- The Worcester County Health Department (WCHD) is proud to announce the launch of a new Addiction in the Workplace awareness campaign. Through Addiction in the Workplace, WCHD will provide educational material such as rack cards and posters, access to a Substance Use Resource Liaison, as well as training opportunities for Naloxone/Narcan, responsible beverage service training, and Mental Health First Aid. Educational material is free-of-cost and readily available, and most trainings are free.

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Walk and Talk events aim to get residents moving: Worcester County Health Department to host community conversation walks.

(Snow Hill, MD)- Are you interested in walking and exploring local, walkable places? The Worcester County Health Department (WCHD) is hosting a series of community Walk and Talk events starting this July. All events are free and open to the public.

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From Ready.gov


Extreme Heat often results in the highest number of annual deaths among all weather-related hazards. In most of the United States, extreme heat is defined as a long period (2 to 3 days) of high heat and humidity with temperatures above 90 degrees. In extreme heat, evaporation is slowed and the body must work extra hard to maintain a normal temperature. This can lead to death by overworking the human body.

 

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 Lower Shore Health Insurance Assistance Program