DHMH Submits to General Assembly a Report on Safety Standards for Outpatient Oncology, Rheumatology Offices

Baltimore, MD (December 17, 2014) – The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH) has submitted a report by the Safety Standards workgroup to the General Assembly. The workgroup was tasked with studying appropriate national safety standards for mixing, reconstituting and performing similar, routine acts by or under the supervision of an oncologist, rheumatologist or hematologist in an outpatient setting.
 
The workgroup was established by Senate Bill 1108, Chapter 580 of the Acts of 2014, and was chaired by DHMH. The workgroup comprised such stakeholders as representatives from the Board of Pharmacy, the Board of Physicians, MedChi, the Maryland and District of Columbia Society of Clinical Oncology (MDCSCO), as well as community practitioners. 
 
The workgroup developed recommendations on the appropriate minimum safety standards for outpatient oncology and rheumatology practices in three key areas: infection control, accurate dosing and administration, and hazardous drugs. 
 
“Safety standards are critical to the safe and effective care of oncology and rheumatology patients because of the baseline immuno-compromised state of many of these individuals and because of the potential for drug toxicity related to specific agents used in these specialties,” said Dr. Mona Gahunia, DHMH’s Chief Medical Officer.
 
“The development of these standards has ensured that oncology providers will have proper procedures to accurately and safely administer chemotherapy to cancer patients. Furthermore, these safety standards can be adapted to allow patients access to cancer treatment services in a range of practice settings,” said Paul Celano, MD, President of MDCSCO.
 
The workgroup’s report can be found here
 

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