DHMH and Baltimore County Department of Health Investigating Cluster of Invasive Group A Streptococcus Associated with Cosmetic Surgery Center

 BALTIMORE (September 19, 2012) – The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH) and the Baltimore County Department of Health are investigating a cluster of three severe invasive Group A Streptococcus (GAS) infections in persons who recently had liposuction at a cosmetic surgery center, Monarch Med Spa, in Timonium, Maryland.  The procedures occurred in mid-August to mid-September.  All three patients were hospitalized; one subsequently died.

DHMH and Baltimore County have ordered the facility closed while the investigation proceeds to determine possible sources of the infections and to limit further spread (the order is attached).  The facility has been cooperative in the course of the investigation.
 
Any individual who has had any procedure at this facility recently and has concerns about a subsequent infection should consult with his/her primary care provider and notify his/her local health department.  Symptoms may include:
  • Fever or influenza-like syndrome
  • Redness at a wound site
  • Abrupt onset of generalized or localized severe pain and swelling, often rapidly increasing
  • Progressive dizziness, weakness and confusion
Group A Streptococci are often found in the throat and on the skin.  These bacteria are spread through direct contact with mucus from the nose or throat of persons who are infected or through contact with infected wounds or sores on the skin or by contact with contaminated surfaces. Sick individuals, such as those who have strep throat or skin infections (impetigo), are most likely to spread the infection.  Persons (also called “carriers”) who carry the bacteria but have no symptoms are much less contagious.
 
Most GAS infections are relatively mild; however, occasionally these bacteria can cause severe and even life-threatening diseases when they infect parts of the body where bacteria usually are not found, such as the blood, muscle, or the lungs.  These infections are termed "invasive GAS disease."
 
Persons with skin lesions (such as cuts, surgical wounds, chickenpox), the elderly, and adults with a history of alcohol abuse or injection drug use have a higher risk for developing invasive GAS disease.  Also, people with chronic illnesses like cancer, diabetes, and chronic heart or lung disease, and those who use medications such as steroids, have a higher risk.
Over the last five years, an average of 189 cases of invasive GAS were reported annually in Maryland.  About 9,000 to 11,500 cases of invasive GAS disease occur each year in the United States, resulting in 1,000 to 1,800 deaths annually. For more information, visit http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dbmd/diseaseinfo/groupastreptococcal_g.htm.
 
Cosmetic surgery centers in Maryland are not currently subject to state licensure. In the near future, DHMH will seek public comment on potential approaches to oversight of these facilities.
 
Media inquiries regarding this infection cluster will be handled by the Baltimore County Department of Health Public Information Office. Call Monique Lyle at 410-887-6092 or 443-463-3757.
 

Substance Abuse Help

 

Zika Information

 

Rabies Information


     

WCHD News

From Ready.gov


Extreme Heat often results in the highest number of annual deaths among all weather-related hazards. In most of the United States, extreme heat is defined as a long period (2 to 3 days) of high heat and humidity with temperatures above 90 degrees. In extreme heat, evaporation is slowed and the body must work extra hard to maintain a normal temperature. This can lead to death by overworking the human body.

 

Read more ...

(Snow Hill, MD)-The Worcester County Health Department (WCHD) and the Maryland Department of Health celebrated this year’s 2018 Healthiest Maryland Business (HMB) awardees at the 9th Annual Maryland in the Workplace Health and Wellness Symposium earlier this month. HMB is a statewide movement to create a culture of wellness at work that makes the healthiest choice the easiest choice. Atlantic General Hospital received the Gold 2018 Healthiest Maryland Business Award for the third consecutive year while Taylor Bank was awarded the Silver 2018 Healthiest Maryland Business Award for their second consecutive year.

Read more ...

The Maryland Department of Health and the Maryland Poison Control Center, in partnership with the CDC, is recommending that clinicians maintain a high index of suspicion for vitamin K-dependent antagonist coagulopathy in patients with a history or suspicion of using synthetic cannabinoids. Patients may present with clinical signs of coagulopathy, bleeding unrelated to an injury, or bleeding without another explanation.

Read more ...

Crystal Bell will participate in "Walkable Communities" training program.


Snow Hill, MD - America Walks, a national advocacy organization working to empower communities to create safe, accessible, and enjoyable places to walk, announced today that they are awarding Crystal Bell, of Worcester County Health Department, a Walking College Fellowship as part of the 2018 program. The Fellowship will enable Bell and other advocates from around the country to participate in a five-month training program designed to strengthen local efforts to make communities more walkable and livable.

Read more ...

Cases are on the Rise—Effects can be Harmful and Deadly

Baltimore, MD (April 17, 2018) – The Maryland Department of Health and the Maryland Poison Center have reported the fourth hospitalization in Maryland from individuals experiencing risk of severe bleeding after using synthetic cannabinoids, which are often called Spice, K2, Bliss, Scooby Snax, or fake weed. 

Read more ...
 Lower Shore Health Insurance Assistance Program