Dr. Gayle Jordan-Randolph Appointed Deputy Secretary for Behavioral Health

 BALTIMORE (October 3, 2012) – Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH) Secretary Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein announced today the appointment of Dr. Gayle Jordan-Randolph to serve as the Deputy Secretary for Behavioral Health. In this position, Dr. Jordan-Randolph will provide executive direction to the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Administration, the Mental Hygiene Administration, the Developmental Disabilities Administration, and Forensic Services.



“I am thrilled that Dr. Jordan-Randolph has agreed to take on this important responsibility at this critical time for behavioral health,” said Dr. Sharfstein. “Her broad training and deep experience make her ideally suited for this challenge.”

Dr. Jordan-Randolph is trained in child psychiatry, adult psychiatry and forensic psychiatry. Her clinical experience includes tenures as a psychiatric consultant for school-based mental health services at the Worcester County Health Department, Medical Director for the Somerset County Health Department’s Division of Behavioral Health, and Clinical Director for the Adolescent Unit at Crownsville Hospital Center. Since 2004, she has served as the clinical director for the Mental Hygiene Administration, where she led policy development, utilization review, implementation of best practices, and efforts on coordination of care. Since February 2012, she has also served as Interim Director for Forensic Services.

In her new position, Dr. Jordan-Randolph will oversee the merger of the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Administration and the Mental Hygiene Administration and develop an outcome-guided behavioral health service delivery system that incorporates prevention, recovery principles, evidence based practices and cost effectiveness.

“This is an exciting time in health care delivery,” Dr. Jordan-Randolph said. “I look forward to the opportunity to lead the statewide integration initiative that is outcome driven and embraces prevention, comprehensive care, evidence based practice and technology.”


Dr. Jordan-Randolph holds a Doctor of Medicine degree from Howard University College of Medicine, a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology from the University of Virginia and a Master of Education degree in Psychology from the University of Virginia. She will start in the new position on October 31, 2012.

 

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