Majority of Marylanders Believe Climate Change Poses Public Health Threat Survey Examined Attitudes about Climate Change and Public Health

BALTIMORE (July 17, 2013) – The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, in conjunction with the Climate Communication Consortium of Maryland and George Mason University, today released the results of the first comprehensive survey of Maryland residents to find out what they think about the public health impacts of climate change. The survey was conducted, in part, to help the Department understand public attitudes about health and the environment, and particularly about two important environmental changes occurring today: climate change and changes in the energy picture of the State and nation.
More than half of Marylanders (52 percent) believe people in the United States are being harmed by climate change. A majority of Marylanders believe respiratory problems, injuries from storms or other extreme weather events and heat stroke will become more common because of climate change.

“Marylanders understand that climate change is real, and that it is already impacting our communities and our families,” said Governor Martin O’Malley. “The results of this survey make clear that the people of our state are ready to make the better choices necessary to reduce our carbon footprint, improve air quality, invest in clean technology, create green jobs and protect our health and the health of our children.”

The survey results provide insight for policy makers, public health officials, and the public about Maryland’s response to climate change and energy needs. As described in the survey report, many people identify threats to health as one of the most important consequences of climate change. Marylanders are already taking personal action to prepare for extreme weather events.

“The survey results help us understand how Marylanders perceive the impact that climate change will have on their health and the health of their communities,” said Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, Secretary of DHMH.

The survey also asked about attitudes related to health, extreme weather, and various energy sources. A large majority of respondents (79 percent) believe that over the past year, extreme weather posed a health risk to people in their community.

“A surprisingly large number of Marylanders understand that climate change, and the extreme weather that arises from it, are serious threats to people’s health” said Dr. Edward Maibach, a co-author on the report from George Mason University. “Moreover, climate change also contributes to two of Marylanders’ other top health concerns, air pollution and insect-borne diseases.”

To read the full survey report, click here.

Funded by the Town Creek Foundation, the survey was mailed to 6,401 households in Maryland, randomly selected from within each of four regions. Conducted from March 28 to June 4, 2013, the survey had a response rate of 38 percent. The survey was developed, and results were analyzed, by researchers with the Center for Climate Change Communication at George Mason University. An additional report from this survey – examining Marylanders’ attitudes, behaviors, and policy preferences regarding energy and climate change – will be released later this month.

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SNOW HILL, Md. – The Worcester County Health Department urges all residents age 6 months and older, including pregnant women and those with medical conditions, to be vaccinated for the 2018-2019 seasonal flu. People age 65 years and older have a choice of two flu vaccines available to them at the Worcester County Health Department. They can choose to receive a regular flu vaccine or a high dose flu vaccine which may result in a stronger immune response against the flu.

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Due to ongoing construction issues, the WACS Center will be closed through October 19 and move services to other locations. The center is scheduled to reopen on Monday, October 22nd.

All services at this site have been relocated to either Snow Hill or the Berlin Health Center. We apologize for any inconvenience. For more information or to check on the status of your appointment, please call 410-632-1100.

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This bacterium is found in the nose, throat and mouth of an infected person, and can be easily spread. Pertussis can occur at any age, but often causes serious problems in babies, and is usually milder in older children and adults. Children who are too young to be fully vaccinated and those that have not received all their vaccinations are at highest risk for severe illness and complications. Complications of pertussis can include pneumonia (infection of the lungs), encephalitis (inflammation of the brain), seizures, and other physical and medical outcomes associated with a severe cough.

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Our new Just Walk Worcester website has information on local parks, walking tips, and videos of trails in our area. If you like to walk, check it out! Click the image below to see the new site. 

 

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Snow Hill, MD- Worcester County Health Department will launch “Just Walk Worcester” on October 12. This new website will be an inclusive resource for finding places to walk and explore no matter where you are in the county. The site features maps of all local parks and trails as well as walking tips, helpful videos, and details about each area including the length of trails, if there are any fees and if the spot is pet-friendly. Residents can view drone footage of each trail, allowing walkers to know the ins and outs of the path before they even lace up their shoes.

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