Rabies Exposures

 

(click on the brochure below to learn more)

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 • If you see a wild animal, such as a raccoon, skunk, fox, groundhog, opossum, or a feral cat behaving in a  threatening or obviously sick manner or should your pet be involved in an altercation with one of those animals –  REPORT IMMEDIATELY to your local police department or Sheriff’s office. 
 
  • Prevent further contact by keeping pets and people away.  If a pet or person has already had contact, it is  important that the rabies suspect animal be obtained (safely) for rabies testing. 
 
  • If a pet has had contact, DO NOT TOUCH the pet barehanded. Make sure the Health Department is contacted  for further instructions, if contact has occurred.  Your pet’s veterinarian may also be contacted for further advice.
 
 

 

Bats and Rabies

 

People usually know when they have been bitten by a bat. However, because bats have small teeth which may leave marks that are not easily seen, there are situations in which you should seek medical advice even in the absence of an obvious bite wound.

• If you find a bat in the living space of your home, and do not know when or how it got in, contact our Office immediately for a risk assessment at 410-641-9559 and do not release the bat. After hours, contact your local police department or dial 410-632-1311 for further assistance.

• For assistance with bat colonies not inside the living area of the home (attics, eves) contact Maryland Department of Natural Resources Wildlife and Heritage Service call   1-877-463-6497 or visit their website at: www.dnr.md.us

• To learn more about the dangers of exposure to bats and rabies, visit: www.cdc.gov

(click on the brochure below to learn more)

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Confirmed Rabid Animals in Worcester


While raccoons make up the vast majority of confirmed rabid animals in Worcester County (and in Maryland), other species are also infected. Many people are not aware that the most frequent domestic animals to contract rabies are cats. 

Year
 Total Confirmed
 Species
2018
7
  6 raccoons, 1 skunk 
2017
10
  8 raccoons, 1 opossum, 1 cat
2016
14
 11 raccoons, 1 skunk, 1 cat, 1 groundhog 
2015
12
 12 raccoons
2014
23
 18 raccoons, 1 fox, 1 bat, 2 cats, 1 skunk
2013
46
 40 raccoons, 3 foxes, 1 groundhog, 1 bat, 1 dog
2012
19
 16 raccoons, 2 foxes, 1 groundhog
2011
16
 11 raccoons, 2 skunks, 2 groundhogs, 1 cat
2010
26
 18 raccoons, 6 foxes, 2 cats
2009
52
 45 raccoons, 5 foxes, 1 opossum, 1 cat



Many of these confirmed rabid animals, as well as many other suspect animals that were unable to be tested, had contact with pets or people. It is extremely important that pets' rabies vaccinations stay current and that these encounters are reported so that testing and proper rabies risk assessments can be made for the people and pets involved.

  • For a line by line listing of confirmed and suspect rabies investigations for 2018, click here.
  • For a line by line listing of confirmed and suspect rabies investigations for 2017, click here.
  • Worcester County map of Laboratory Confirmed Rabid Animals found 2017, click here.
  • For a line by line listing of confirmed and suspect rabies investigations for 2016, click here.
  • For a line by line listing of confirmed and suspect rabies investigations for 2015, click here.
  • For a line by line listing of laboratory confirmed positive rabies cases and suspect positve rabies investigations for 2014, click here.
  • Worcester County map of Laboratory Confirmed Rabid Animals found 2011-2016, click here.
  • For a line by line listing of laboratory confirmed positive rabies cases and suspect positive rabies investigations for 2013, click here.
  • For more information about rabies in Maryland, visit www.dhmh.maryland.gov

 

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Rabies Clinics



• Maryland and Worcester County laws require current rabies vaccinations for all cats, dogs and ferrets four months and older. Rabies vaccinations         (shots) are available at any veterinary clinic and should be a part of your pet's routine health care.
 

• The Worcester County Health Department together with Worcester County Animal Control offers rabies clinics throughout the county. 
 

• The next clinics will be in the spring of 2018. You may call Animal Control at 410-632-1340 or our office at  410-641-9559 for updated information.

 

 

• The cost per pet is $5 for Worcester County residents and $10 per pet for non residents. Please bring proof of residency. Dogs must be on leashes and under the control of an adult. Cats and ferrets must be in carriers with air holes. In order to receive a 3-year booster shot you must bring your pet’s previous vaccination certificate.
 

 
This information is provided by the Environmental Health Program.

 

 

 

 

 

Substance Abuse Help

 

Zika Information

 

Rabies Information


     

WCHD News

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 Lower Shore Health Insurance Assistance Program